Leeuwenhoek had stolen and peeped into the fantastic sub-visible world of little things, creatures that had lived, had bred, had battled, had died, completely hidden from and unknown to all men from the beginning of time. Beasts these were of a kind that ravaged and annihilated whole races of men ten million times larger than they were themselves. Beings these were, more terrible than fire-spitting dragons or hydra-headed monsters. They were silent assassins that murdered babies in warm cradles and kings in sheltered places. It was this invisible, insignificant, but implacable-and sometimes friendly- world Leeuwenhoek had looked into for the first time of all men of all countries. ~Microbe Hunters

Wednesday, 3 April 2013

Chlamydia

Greetings, Day 3! I made a logo for my theme! It's really lame, but, yah know... it's Medical Laboratory Science for the reason that it's NOT graphic design, or something. Just a warning, in case you couldn't tell from the title, this post is a bit PG rated. Although, if children read it, they would be less inclined to "do the nasty"...

Chlamydia! The most common Sexually Transmitted Infection (STI). Remember to not call it an “STD” (Sexually Transmitted Disease) because the angry people who are infected with it do not like being called “diseased”.  There is a very disturbing finding in the city in which I attend school, which is the stats for CHILDREN UNDER 12 that are infected. Since Chlamydia is only spread through sexual contact, that means that children under 12 are sexually active. That disturbs me. Anyways, if you are infected with the organism Chlamydia Trachomatis you are treated with antibiotic therapy, and you are healed. The problem is being diagnosed. Males, with their main genitalia on the exterior of their body, present with more clinical symptoms i.e. red and sore sort of thing. Also, unlike females, notice the pus or white-ish discharge from the penile opening. Females in which a small amount of vaginal discharge is normal, typically do not notice a change. Also, since their sexual organs are on the interior of their body, they do not notice physical signs. If the infection goes untreated, women can become infertile as the infection spreads and can scar areas of the reproductive system essential in child-bearing. An interesting thing that can happen in untreated Chlamydia infections is that the organism can travel to the fluid around your joints known as synovial fluid!

Anyways. Story time. One of my (very interesting) profs last year told us a story of why we should get tested after EVERY partner and to NEVER cheat when you’re in a relationship. The story goes a little along the lines of this:
Man and women marry, and live happily for 2 years, then woman gets pregnant. Women and prof go to doctor for check-up and doctor asks to run an STI screen test, just in case. (Chlamydia can be passed from mother to child during birth causing eye infections). Women’s test comes back positive for chlamydia. Man has to admit to affair. BAM.
Don’t cheat. Get tested.


Darn good and sure of it,

adot

12 comments:

  1. You came to my blog and I am so glad I returned the visit. This is the coolest blog! And I am not even s science person.... I read all three of your posts so far. You have a way of presenting information in an entertaining and accessible fashion. I forward to reading more!

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  2. I worked for an STD testing facility last year. People disgust me. I heard so many terrible stories.

    Returning visit for A to Z.

    Brett Minor
    Transformed Nonconformist

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    1. It's crazy how they have whole testing facilities!!

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  3. Although very informative I think it should have been under a different catagory, I think most people know of these things , however much work have gone into your post, making interesting reading.

    Yvonne ( one of Arlee Bird;s Ambassadors for the challenge)

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    1. I'm not sure what you mean by "different category", but note taken.

      Thanks for stopping by.

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  4. It's crazy how common this is. You'd think people would have learned by now that this is only the tip of the iceberg!

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  5. The thought of little kids with chlamydia makes me sad :(

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  6. How is it that helpful medical information is inappropriate, but someone who types in broken English is allowed to be a blog "ambassador" and judge your writing?

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    Replies
    1. Sometimes I wonder the same...

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