Leeuwenhoek had stolen and peeped into the fantastic sub-visible world of little things, creatures that had lived, had bred, had battled, had died, completely hidden from and unknown to all men from the beginning of time. Beasts these were of a kind that ravaged and annihilated whole races of men ten million times larger than they were themselves. Beings these were, more terrible than fire-spitting dragons or hydra-headed monsters. They were silent assassins that murdered babies in warm cradles and kings in sheltered places. It was this invisible, insignificant, but implacable-and sometimes friendly- world Leeuwenhoek had looked into for the first time of all men of all countries. ~Microbe Hunters

Saturday, 13 April 2013

Leeuwenhoek

Whoaaa it's the end of week 2 for A-Z Challenge already! 3 finals Monday *sadface*. Anyways, here is Leeuwenhoek, my favorite scientist EVER.
Anton Van Leeuwenhoek was a man of many sorts who accidently discovered “animalcules” (which I think is the cutest word ever). He was not a microbiologist, but his (really strange) hobby of grinding up glass then putting it back together allowed him to see tiny bacteria, which he called animalcules. The very strange man, who invented the first microscope, took to the grave the art of making microscopes because he had not shared the skill with anyone. Although the link to disease was not made at this time, the presence of microbes allowed for many advancements in knowledge that are common practice for us today. Leeuwenhoek is one of my favorite people in history because of his uneducated revelations on science. I really love the quote from Paul de Kruif’s book, Microbe Hunters which is on the banner below the title on my blog. It reads:
Leeuwenhoek had stolen and peeped into the fantastic sub-visible world of little things, creatures that had lived, had bred, had battled, had died, completely hidden from and unknown to all men from the beginning of time. Beasts these were of a kind that ravaged and annihilated whole races of men ten million times larger than they were themselves. Beings these were, more terrible than fire-spitting dragons or hydra-headed monsters. They were silent assassins that murdered babies in warm cradles and kings in sheltered places. It was this invisible, insignificant, but implacable-and sometimes friendly- world Leeuwenhoek had looked into for the first time of all men of all countries.

Darn good and sure of it,

adot

4 comments:

  1. I wouldn't say that Leeuwenhoek is my favorite scientist but his name is by far the most fun to say. :)

    KC @ The Occasional Adventures of a Hermit & Oh Frog It

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    1. His name is pretty interesting! It's Dutch :)

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  2. Interesting scientist ... uneducated revelations ... how did he do it? Sheer passion and intuition perhaps, coupled with intelect.
    Great read.

    Silvia @ Silvia Writes

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    1. I wonder the same thing! That's what makes him so fascinating to me :)
      Thanks for stopping by!

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